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Did You Know That...


1948 years ago in AD 63 an earthquake in southern Italy by the gulf of Naples seriously damaged the ancient city of Pompeii causing an undetermined number of deaths and spread out destruction, but the locals went to work rebuilding in the same spot until they were buried by the eruption of the Vesuvius volcano 16 years later in AD 79.



Galveston TX Hurricanes

Average Brushed or hit every 2.94 years
Average Direct hit every 8.63 years

The Great Storm of 1900 - Sep 8th 1900 - Pop: 42,000 residents
Category 4 @ 135 mph -Great loss of life between 6,000 and 12,000 individuals – officially 8,000

The 1915 Storm, August 17th, Category 4 @ 135 mph
42    people dead in the Galveston area
$60 - 1915 million dollars in damage

Ike Sep 13th 2008 - The third most destructive hurricane to ever make landfall in the United States
Final landfall in Galveston Texas as a strong cat 2 with cat 5 equivalent storm surge winds extended 120 miles from the center.

Blamed for at least 195 deaths – 74 in Haiti and 112 in the USA 300 still missing. - Damages estimated at 24 billion (2008) US Dollars

Resulted in the largest evacuation in the state of Texas history and the largest search and rescue operation in US history


Nuclear Issues

Chernobyl, An Experiment Gone Wrong

On Saturday, April 26th, 1986 at 1:23 am, one of the reactors at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded.
Ironically, the experiment consisted in testing how the power plant would respond in the event of an accident. The operators at the plant wanted to bring down the power output of the reactor to 25%, but over-confidence, poor training and poor knowledge of how a reactor works caused them to overdo it, and they ended up bringing down the power output to 1%. When they then tried to bring it up to 25%, the reactor overheated and exploded causing the worst nuclear accident in history.

Five U.S. nuclear reactors in earthquake zones
usatoday.com


Status of the Nuclear Reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant
NYTimes.com


How a Reactor Shuts Down and What Happens in a Meltdown
NYTimes.com


Hazards of Storing Spent Fuel
NYTimes.com


Timeline: Nuclear Plant Accidents
BBCNews.com


Why the Fukushima disaster is worse than Chernobyl
independent.co.uk


In graphics: Fukushima nuclear alert
bbc.co.uk


Fukushima victims: homeless, desperate & angry
reuters.com


Japan Panel: Fukushima nuclear disaster "man-made"
bbc.co.uk.com






More, Did You Know That


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I T: FDIC Special Alert
Posted on Tuesday, October 28 @ 14:44:33 PDT by admin

Special Alert


SA-205-2008
October 28, 2008
SUBJECT: Phishing Scams Involving Financial Institutions in the News


Summary: Fraudulent phishing e-mails claiming to be from, or related to, financial institutions involved in high-profile mergers, acquisitions or failures are reportedly in circulation.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is warning consumers, businesses and financial institutions to be aware of fraudulent e-mails allegedly from, or related to, financial institutions that have been the subject of recent news stories. Phishing e-mails often incorporate aspects of high-profile news stories – such as bank mergers, acquisitions and failures – to create a sense of urgency and legitimacy for requesting information or action.

These types of fraudulent e-mails may request recipients to verify computer logon credentials, update personal information, or activate new online security features. The fraudulent e-mails may include a link that directs the recipient to a fraudulent or "spoofed" Web site that looks similar to the subject institution's legitimate Web site. Once there, users may be prompted to provide information about online banking credentials or other personal and confidential information that could be used to gain unauthorized access to online banking services or perpetrate identity theft. These spoofed Web sites may also direct the user to download software updates or digital certificates, which may actually be malicious code or software attempting to collect online banking credentials or other personal and confidential information.

Consumers, businesses and financial institutions should be wary of unsolicited e-mails purportedly from financial institutions recently in the news and take the following precautions:
Do not follow Web links in unsolicited e-mails from apparent financial institutions. Instead, use Web browser bookmarks or type your institution's Web address into the browser address bar when accessing your bank's Web site or online banking services.
Always use anti-virus software and ensure the virus signatures are automatically updated. Ensure the computer operating system and common software applications are up-to-date with security patches installed.
Do not open unsolicited or unexpected e-mail attachments claiming to be from a financial institution because of the risk of malicious code or software. As a precaution, call the financial institution using an appropriate telephone number, such as one from an account statement, to validate the e-mail and attached file before opening any attachment.
Be aware that phishing e-mails frequently use new and innovative ways to trick recipients into providing logon credentials and confidential information or into unleashing malicious code.
Regularly review financial account statements and immediately report any discrepancies to your institution.
Be mindful that financial institutions generally deliver notices to consumers in writing about changes in account terms and conditions unless the consumer previously agreed to receive the notice electronically.

For additional information about safe online banking and avoiding online scams, visit:
http://www.fdic.gov/consumers/consumer/guard/.

 
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